Wedding

On August 8,  Holly and I celebrated 40 years of marriage.  In 1980, things were very different than they are today.  We met on a missions trip to Mexico in June of 1978. She stayed in Mexico for several months and I came back to the states to start my first year of college. Eventually, she ended up in Pennsylvania, and I was in Ohio. In those days, the means of communication were a lot different than what we have today.  There was no email, video chat, or social media. Long distance telephone calls were very expensive per minute,  unlike the free long distance that we enjoy today.  So we communicated through the US postal service.  Today, I am glad that we did, because we still have all of our letters. Recently we sat down, and read through them together, and laughed, reminisced, and thanked the Lord for bringing us together. 

In this song, I honor my wife. She has been a wonderful one--the best that a man could ask for.  She has been a faithful mother, and the glue of our family.  I can honestly say that she is the epitome of a Proverbs 31 wife and mother.  “Her children arise up, and call her blessed; her husband also, and he praiseth her.” (Proverbs 31:28 KJV)

I don't know how many more years we have together, but as the song says, "in this heart of mine I've no regrets" Speaking of the song, one week before our anniversary, I woke up on a Saturday, and was just kind of playing around on my guitar, and the tune, as well as the chord progression came to me. That night after Holly went to bed, I stayed up and wrote all of the words in about 2 hours. In the week that followed, I recorded and produced the song. On the night before our anniversary, I texted the song to her, and she heard it for the first time.  All of this took place in our apartment.  I am thankful for modern technology that makes these kinds of things possible!  I hope you enjoy it. 

 

iStock 1023227352If you have attended an evangelical church for any length of time, no doubt you have sung this song during congregational worship. It was written by English pastor and theologian, Isaac Watts (1674-1748).  We know nothing about the circumstances surrounding the writing of this song, but we do know that it was published in 1707. Watts published over 600 hymns including such songs as, "Joy to the World",  "When I Survey the Wondrous Cross",  "Our God,  Our Help in Ages Past".

 In 1885, Ralph Erskine Hudson an evangelist who lived from (1843-1901) set the words to the present tune, and added the chorus.  

Fanny Crosby, said that this song was instrumental in her conversion.  Leagh Matthews writes:

"Fanny Crosby, the beloved hymnist, attended a revival meeting in 1851.  While there, the congregation sang Alas and did my Savior bleed for the wattsinvitational.  Crosby was so moved that she prayed “There Lord, I give myself away…”  She stated that afterwards she was a changed woman.  Crosby would go on to write over 8,000 hymns.  Many of these hymns such as Blessed Assurance and Draw Me Nearer are still sung today. All of this because Fanny Crosby was inspired by the words of Isaac Watts."  Leagh Matthews

I have recorded two rounds of the song, using my Taylor 816 CE, and some software instruments on my iPad Pro.  It you would like to purchase a copy of this MP3, with just the music, you can do so by going here . Thank you for listening!


IMG 0021This song was written by the very prolific hymn writer, Fanny Crosby, who lived from 1820 to 1915.  She wrote over 8000 hymns and gospel songs.  Such hymns as, "Blessed Assurance", "I Shall Know Him", and "To God be the Glory" came from her heart through her hand, despite being blind most of her life.  

"One evening, Fanny Crosby was invited to speak to a group of prisoners at the state prison and heard one of the men say  'Good Lord! Do not pass me by! Do not turn your back on me. Do not ignore me, forget me, neglect me.' Fanny told that she was so touched by the pleas of these men that she could not get the thought of them out of her mind indeed she said, 'I wrote the lines with the men’s pleading wail still in my ears.'  She went home that night and wrote all four verses of the hymn." Diana Leagh Matthews

She composed the song in 1868 and William H Doane set it to music in 1870.

I recorded it utilizing four tracks played only on a Taylor 814CE acoustic guitar. I hope that you enjoy it!

If you would like to purchase your own MP3 please click here

 

Pass, me not O gentle Saviour,
Hear my humble cry.
While on others Thou art calling,
Do not pass me by. 

Saviour, Saviour,
Hear my humble cry.
While on others Thou art calling,
Do not pass me by.

Let me at Thy throne of mercy,
Find a sweet relief.
Kneeling there in deep contrition,
Help my unbelief.

Saviour, Saviour,
Hear my humble cry.
While on others Thou art calling,
Do not pass me by.

Trusting only in Thy merit,
Would I seek Thy face,
Heal my wounded, broken spirit,
Save me by Thy grace.

Fanny J. Crosby, 1868[1]